Preview

InterPlay

Tabea Blumenschein
Ulrike Ottinger

Selbstauslöser mit Tabea Blumenschein, Erdmannstraße 12, 1976, Archiv Ulrike Ottinger

Selbstauslöser mit Tabea Blumenschein, Erdmannstraße 12, 1976, Archiv Ulrike Ottinger

© Ulrike Ottinger

The artist Tabea Blumenschein (1952–2020) is best known to the public for the roles she played in films by Ulrike Ottinger (*1942), who enjoys an international reputation as a cinema director. In the latter half of her life, Blumenschein’s artistic creativity found a second powerful form of expression in drawing. She made hundreds of fictional and stylised portraits in her two-dimensional, comic-like style. Her figures tend to be androgynous, with costumes and attributes such as colourful tattoos that root them in queerness and subculture.

About 40 colourful big formats have been chosen by the Berlinische Galerie to showcase this little-known graphic oeuvre. Combining these with a similar number of photographs by Ulrike Ottinger, which depict Tabea Blumenschein on various film projects, the show celebrates the artistic collaboration and friendship between two salient figures of Berlin’s art scene during the 1970s and 1980s.

This exhibition is being held on the occasion of a large donation of works by Tabea Blumenschein from the collection of Ulrike Ottinger to the Berlinische Galerie. It underpins the museum’s deep, unwavering interest in the artistic accomplishments of twentieth century women. Apart from honouring pre-war modernists like Jeanne Mammen and Lotte Laserstein, the Berlinische Galerie regularly devotes retrospectives to contemporary female artists based in Berlin, such as Dorothy Iannone and Loredana Nemes.

Tabea BLumenschein, Ohne Titel (Porträt), 1989, Sammlung Ulrike Ottinger

Tabea Blumenschein, Ohne Titel (Porträt), 1989, Sammlung Ulrike Ottinger

© Townes / Shoko Kawaida / Harald Blumenschein

Next dates

Opening: InterPlay

Tabea Blumenschein. Ulrike Ottinger.

This exhibition was implemented by Berlinische Galerie in the tradition of Verborgenes Museum and was supported by Hauptstadtkulturfonds (HKF).