Preview

Magyar Modern

Hungarian Art in Berlin 1910–1933

Mann steht neben einem Tisch, im Hintergrund großes Fenster mit Blick auf Häuser

Lajos Tihanyi, Großes Interieur mit Selbstbildnis – Mann am Fenster, Detail, 1922

© Museum der Bildenden Künste, Budapest, 2021

This exhibition breaks new ground by devoting extensive attention to the Hungarian contribution to modern art in the German capital. Berlin plays a special role in the history of Hungarian art and culture. Even before the First World War, Hungarian artists used the growing metropolis as an exhibition stage to reach an international audience. When reactionary forces put an end to Hungary’s political transformation in 1919, progressive artists in exile found refuge in the cosmopolitan Berlin of the Weimar Republic. They found the space for creative freedom on the banks of the Spree, where they established a significant visibility in various avantgarde contexts. Berlin was a formative influence for many Hungarian artists who, in turn, were a defining force in the art market. Restoring memories of this reciprocal cultural inspiration is the principal aim of this exhibition. It brings together paintings, prints, photographs and architectural drawings, deeply enriching our perception of artistic achievements from East Central Europe.

Artists (Selection):

Miklós Bandy, József Bató, Róbert Berény, Aurél Bernáth, Éva Besnyő, Vjera Biller, Mihály Biró, Dezső Bokros Birman, Sándor Bortnyik, Brassaï, Marcel Breuer, Béla Czóbel, Lajos d’Ébneth, Sándor Ék, Jenő Feiks, Béni Ferenczy, Károly Ferenczy, Noémi Ferenczy, Fréd Forbát, Gyula Hincz, Ernő Jeges, Béla Kádár, György Kákai Szabó, Ernő Kállai, Judit Kárász, Lajos Kassák, Oskar Kaufmann, Alfréd Kemény, György Kepes, Károly Kernstok, János Mattis Teutsch, László Moholy-Nagy, Martin Munkácsi, József Nemes Lampérth, Gyula Pap, Peter László Péri, Bertalan Pór, József Rippl-Rónai, Hugó Scheiber, Jolán Szilágyi, Lajos Tihanyi, Béla Uitz, Andor Weininger

The exhibition is a partnership between the Berlinische Galerie and the Museum of Fine Arts in Budapest – Hungarian National Gallery.

The exhibition and catalogue is funded by